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Biosociology : bridging the biology-sociology divide

Author: Anthony Walsh
Publisher: New Brunswick (U.S.A.) : Transaction Publishers, [2014]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Anthony Walsh bridges the divide separating sociology from biology{u2014}a divide created in the late nineteenth century when sociology emerged from the fields of social theory and philosophy. Walsh focuses on the viewpoint held by former American Sociological Association president Douglas Massey: sociologists have allowed the fact that we are social beings to obscure the biological foundations upon which our  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Anthony Walsh
ISBN: 9781412852562 1412852560
OCLC Number: 828264930
Description: xix, 285 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: The biosocial perspective and why sociology needs it --
Genetics and human social behavior --
Brain-culture interaction and co-evolution --
The reality of human nature --
Intelligence and society --
Culture and socialization --
Socioeconomic status --
The family: nursery of human nature --
Social constructionism, social roles, and gender --
Crime and criminals --
Political economy, emotion, and human nature.
Responsibility: Anthony Walsh.

Abstract:

Anthony Walsh bridges the divide separating sociology from biology{u2014}a divide created in the late nineteenth century when sociology emerged from the fields of social theory and philosophy. Walsh focuses on the viewpoint held by former American Sociological Association president Douglas Massey: sociologists have allowed the fact that we are social beings to obscure the biological foundations upon which our behavior ultimately rests. Walsh argues that sociology has nothing to fear and a wealth of riches to gain if it pays attention to the theories, concepts, and methodologies of the biological sciences. Both study the same phenomena. Beginning with an examination of the reasons why we need a biosocial approach, Walsh explores sociology{u2019}s traditional "taboo" concepts (reductionism, essentialism, etc.) and how those concepts are viewed in the natural sciences. Throughout the work, the author introduces relevant concepts from genetics and the neurosciences, using examples that will appeal to all sociologists. Later chapters apply his introductory arguments to traditional substantive sociological issues such as culture, crime, gender, socialization, social class, and the family. This book will be essential to all sociologists, evolutionary biologists, and scholars interested in the history of this important divide between the fields and where it currently stands. --Provided by publisher.
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-[D]raws important connections between biology and sociology that bring the two together in a college-level discussion arguing that sociology has little to use by acknowledging and working with the Read more...

 
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